Most people with driver’s licenses already know that there are certain things they shouldn’t do before getting behind the wheel or while driving. People can and do knowingly engage in behaviors that they acknowledge will increase the risk of a crash. Drunk driving is one example. Distracted driving is another. 

Distracted driving reduces a driver’s ability to reach their destination safely. It generally comes from people’s inaccurate belief that what is dangerous for others is not dangerous for them. That’s why many people will tell you that they can multitask safely behind the wheel, even though multitasking is actually a myth. Alternatively, they may convince themselves that something isn’t really “distracted driving” since it’s so common, like eating behind the wheel.

These mistaken beliefs likely contribute to hundreds of preventable crashes every year.

Distracted driving is responsible for thousands of deaths

Constant connection via mobile devices has changed everything from socialization to work expectations. Whether you have a demanding friend who expects an immediate response to their text messages or a boss who expects the same, it can be hard to control the impulse to reach for your phone and check a message when you receive a notification. 

The people who succumb to this kind of temptation are responsible for causing a substantial number of fatal and injurious crashes each year. In 2018, the last year with comprehensive statistics available, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that 2,841 people died due to distraction.

Avoiding distractions at the wheel can help you stay safe. However, your commitment to safety won’t prevent you from getting into a crash caused by someone else who is not as responsible as you. If that happens, find out more about your legal options for recovery.